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Artist of the Month
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May 2016
Mo Troper
"Beloved
"
mp3

 Yes, you've heard the name Mo Troper before. Possibly as a part of Sancho and Your Rival, or maybe as a founder of blowing up label Good Cheer Records. Regardless, his recent release, late April's Beloved, has already reached levels of critical acclaim in just its first few days of actual release. And I'm adding to the pile - Beloved is one of the best new records to come out of Portland so far this year, and it's our new Album of the Month.

With a witty tongue and a sneering outlook on many things in life, Troper blares through Beloved's 13 tracks like an emotional Facebook feed. He, like the rest us, has shitty friends, a distaste for most social situations ("Star Wars") and a rollercoaster relationship with dating ("Princess," "Somebody Special"). He bitingly belts out his lyrics as if he's reliving every situation that's inspired him, making for a brashly heartfelt stock.

Beloved has received heavy comparisons to certain Elvis Costello albums and while that's fair in its own right, isn't entirely the whole case. The album does play into a Costello-esque domination of word play, but it holds a cult like influence closer to that of, say, the Get Up Kids and Saves the Day.

For his first release on his own, Mo Troper has already established himself as a solid solo artist to follow. Beloved will inevitably be added to a list of "classics," and his next album is already baiting with anticipation.


This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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nashville

Taco Dreams delivers on new wave punk irreverence with "John Cougar Watermelon Camp Counselor"

John Cougar Watermelon Camp Counselor, the tape-ready debut from Taco Dreams, is relentlessly energetic throughout without being exhausting. There are notes of The Smiths, Echo and the Bunnymen, and Stone Roses, only with a great deal mopre levity than any of those new wave forebears. It's not a brand new sound per se, but between Taco Dreams and several other new-on-the-scene groups, it's incredibly exciting to see the Nuggetsy-garage vibe that overtook East Nasty for the longest effetively exploring some other sounds. -Austin Phy

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The forecast calls for warmth and a strong chance of sunshine pop on Father Tribe's self-titled EP

This one slipped by my radar when it first came out, but Bandcamp's search likes to make up its own rules sometimes. Occasionally, that causes a gem to surface, such as Father Tribe's self-titled EP. All the hallmarks of summertime listening are there—the 'verb, the lilting vocal sustains, the laid back tempo. Of course, these things can get a little one-dimensional. Fortunately it isn't all sunshine and rainbows; it's got that modern beach pop shimmer for sure, but it's balanced out with the sense of urgency of 1980s synthpop. Give it a spin if you're so inclined. We'd recommend it. -Austin Phy

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Boom Forest explores all different faces of electronica and folk on "Post Knight Errant"

Post Knight Errant, the latest from ex-Wisconsinite John Paul Roney's Boom Forest project, explores a range of folk and electronica influences, deftly using the natural ebb and flow of that exploration to cover the entire spectrum of emotional experience. There's a current of tenderness running through the album, but it proves to be tonally versatile and adapts to the highs and lows from song to song and within a single track. It's a polished effort, and you ought to give the video a watch below and then go check out the entire album. -Austin Phy

Boom Forest "33" (We Are All One & Holy Ghost) from Elder on Vimeo.


It's the mid-2000s again and I love it: Ghostfinger, How I Became the Bomb, and Lone Official at the Exit/In tonight

I think the cancellation of Nashville (the show, not the city itself) got a lot of people thinking about where Nashville (the city itself, not the show) is, has been, and is going. We're not gonna get too think-piecey on you here, but recent events like that have proven that time may in fact be a circle. There's no prime time TV dedicated to our lovely city, sounds from The Features and Character are still electrifying the ground around the Beast from their show last night, and if you get yourself down to the Exit/In tonight, you can catch yourself yet another piece of bona fide Old Nashville vibiness with Ghostfinger, How I Became the Bomb, and Lone Official.

We're leaning pretty heavy on the throwback jokes here, but make no mistake—these are all bands that, despite various periods of silence and an unfortunate spot on the It City sidelines considering their role in building up that rep, were here before here was a place to be and they've all stuck it out. So go for the nostalgia. Or go to show respect to the old guard. Or go because it's a stacked bill of genuinely great local bands. Whatever your motive is, you can't go wrong. -Austin Phy


Deli Premiere: Notelle has confidence to spare on "No One Else Alive"

Sometimes you hear a song and know right away that it's going to follow you around for a while. "No One Else Alive" is the unshakably catchy new track from the unshakably talented Notelle, and it's got just the right kind of hook to dig itself in deep. The sound on display is big, in a perplexingly minimal way. "Anthemic" is an easy descriptor that comes to mind, but there's a measure of restraint in the actual execution that keeps the whole affair from becoming too bombastic. It's radio pop perfection, and you can catch the ear worm down in the stream below. -Austin Phy

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