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Tender Loving Empire Grand Opening Party Tonight!

 

You're already supporting local music right? So why not support all other types of creative endeavors all under one roof? Tender Loving Empire, the Whole Foods of media and art, is having their Grand Opening Party tonight from 6 - 10pm.

TLE is a media and arts collective, record label, comics imprint, consignment store with tons of homemade goods (cards, jewelry, pillows), gallery, custom screenprinter, concert/event production house, and a dangerous place to go if you are on a shopping hiatus.

Under their label are popular local bands Typhoon, Hosannas, and Boy Eats Drum Machine, the lattter of which will be playing at the party at 8:30 p.m. You can also check out earlier in the night an art show curated by Hungry Eyeball.

TLE is fully supportive of Do It Yourself activities, so why don’t you Do Yourself a favor and head out to their party tonight at 412 SW 10th Ave. (1-1/2 blocks south of Powell's Books, across from the Ace Hotel Cleaners)?

It will be a great chance to hear some good music, see some cool art, support the local arts, and check out awesome handmade items in their store. But be warned, I hear it's hard to leave without buying something.

- Deanna Uutela

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Save the mustache, save The Parlour!

 

The Parlour, Southeast Portland’s All-Ages Mustachioed Venue, only burst forth in late October, but the venue needs your help to stay open or it may be forced to close its doors before the end of May.

Here's a Facebook note from the hosts:

The Parlour crew has been hanging on as tightly as we could since the very beginning, but recent unfortunate developments with the property have made it impossible for us to continue as what we are. It weighs very heavily in our minds to have to notify our patrons and acts of this drastic change, but we will be unable to keep our doors open after a short while, most likely the end of May, if not sooner. We just might be able to save this, though!

This Thursday, come down to The Parlour to try to save southeast Portland's all ages venue! Felecia & The Dinosaur, Your Canvas and Soap Collectors will be playing deliciously awesome sets for you splendid little ears in hopes that we might stick around! All the proceeds from the door will be going to The Parlour to help us batten our doors and keep this thing afloat!

7pm, donations at the door, all ages!

- Chris Young

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Pierced Arrows Set to Teach the Pipsqueaks a Thing or Two Tonight at Rotture

 

Though married musicians Fred and Toody Cole are now in their 60s, the rock 'n’ roll duo show no signs of retirement. The indie rock veterans performed for 20 years with their band Dead Moon, but since that band's demise in 2006, you'll have to see them grace the stage of Rotture tonight with Pierced Arrows. This is most definitely not a bad thing.

The '80s garage/country-rock style that Dead Moon was known and respected for is not missing from Pierced Arrows' potent lineup of tunes, but you will hear more of a punk influence thanks in part to the tenacious drumming of Kelly Halliburton. This band has more fire, stage presence and energy than a band half their age, and it's easy to see why they have been owning Portland stages for over two decades.

Check out these living legends at Rotture tonight along with Hungry Ghost, and Lana Rebel & the Broken Promises. And don't forget to help welcome Don't's new CD into the world, as they parlay their old school punk/blues/country conglomerate under the watchful lead guitar of Dan Lowinger, and the Hynde-esque vocals of Jenny Don't. 

Show kicks off at 9 p.m with a cover charge of a measly $8.

- Deanna Uutela

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Interview w/ Brent DeBoer - Record Release Show at the Woods Tonight!

 

Brent “Fathead” DeBoer, the drummer and backup vocalist for The Dandy Warhols, has had a pretty impressive career. The Dandys have toured with such greats as The Rolling Stones and Tom Petty, and are soon releasing an album of their greatest hits. DeBoer recently stepped out on his own to record a solo album, The Farmer, a melodic collection of acoustic songs, a portion of the proceeds from which are being donated to charity.

DeBoer was kind enough to sit down and have a chat with The Deli Portland regarding David Bowie, the hillbilly folk scene, and tonight's show at the newest hit venue in Portland, The Woods.

What inspired you for this album The Farmer?

Well, Brian Coates (of The Great Northwest) for sure, and anyone on the committee, dead or alive, that I could imagine listening to it. At the time, I was living in the rock dorm and Brian Coates lived downstairs. He writes melodic, acoustic, trippy, sad songs, and I was tying to do a bunch of songs like his in that way. Then eight years later, when he was recording Zia MaCabe’s (Dandy Warhols' keyboardist) album, he was recording her. She’d get done at 10:00 p.m, they’d work until then and then I came in, broke out all the old cassettes, and Brian and I would work until six in the morning. But yeah, I’d say the biggest influence would be Brian Coates.

A portion of the proceeds from The Farmer are going to the MS Foundation. Why is that a cause that’s important to you?

My dad has MS, and when I’d recorded this with Coatsie, I didn’t know what I was going to do with it. We put it on and it sounded pretty cool, and we wanted to do something with it that would be different. Most albums, especially something like this, they just come and go and they wouldn’t really matter that much. But I wanted to think of a way for a different audience to hear it, and I started thinking of charity things, and MS was an obvious one, considering my Dad, and the fact that I’d done the MS walk a few times, so we called up the people at the Oregon chapter at the MS Society, so we’re contributing some of the proceeds to fight MS.

What are the highlights of your career so far?

There’s a handful. There’s been a few massive concerts, big shows around the world, but I think the main thing would be just having musical peers show appreciation by coming to your concerts, or mentioning in the press how much they like a certain song or album. Having David Bowie and his band come to see us play a few times made us feel really good. Generally when you start a band, you’re not thinking about fame or money or chicks, you’re just trying to be accepted by your peers in the music world. Even if it’s just some fantasy figure you imagine, that’s what you’re really thinking of. So to have Joe Strummer walk up to me at a festival and ask when we were going on, and tell me he loved the music, or having Bowie come to the show, it makes it easier to sleep at night. It makes it easier to ignore it when you hear some snotty reviewer rag on you - you rest assured that they’re wrong. I care more about Joe Strummer's opinion than some guy writing for some rag out of Denver who gives us a shitty review.

What’s next for you?

We have the Dandy Warhols greatest hits collection coming out, which we’re calling The Capitol Years, considering the fact that we never really had a collection, or more than one semi-hit. It’s just a collection of songs that had videos, or were sent to radio stations by Capitol Records. There are two bonus tracks, and those are just about done. I’m also recording an album of songs of mine and my friends Bob Harrow and Gamma, who are both from Australia. We’re calling it Immigrant Union. We’re recording it with Greg Williams who produced the album Thirteen Tales for the Dandys. The ultimate dream for Immigrant Union is to tour country music fairs, going overseas, playing the Grand Ole Opry, the Austin City Limits Festival…just that other world of country world of hillbilly folk. It’s a world I don’t know, but I’d really like to. That’s the band that’ll play with me on April 30th, at The Woods. It’s $15, but it’s worth it because the money goes to a good cause.

Brent De Boer’s solo record The Farmer is raising money to fight MS, and is available now on CD Baby.

- Arielle Mullen

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Spirituals Drops New Track in Anticipation of Forthcoming Album

 

Spirituals is the pseudonym for musician, producer and graphic designer, Tyler Tadlock. After recently moving from Jackson, Mississippi, he began working on his first album, coming out soon on Waaga Records.

His electronic, sample-based tunes draw heavily from extensive sampling, recorded from free jazz projects back in Jackson. A new track by the name of "Wanderings" has just been released and can be heard below:

The track sounds glitchy without being too edgy or annoying. Sounds and samples break and build as the song slowly gains repetitive momentum. It's pretty cool, refreshing and different than a lot of other stuff out there - check it.

The debut album is slated for release June 22nd.

- Joel Sommer

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