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Interview w/ Brent DeBoer - Record Release Show at the Woods Tonight!

 

Brent “Fathead” DeBoer, the drummer and backup vocalist for The Dandy Warhols, has had a pretty impressive career. The Dandys have toured with such greats as The Rolling Stones and Tom Petty, and are soon releasing an album of their greatest hits. DeBoer recently stepped out on his own to record a solo album, The Farmer, a melodic collection of acoustic songs, a portion of the proceeds from which are being donated to charity.

DeBoer was kind enough to sit down and have a chat with The Deli Portland regarding David Bowie, the hillbilly folk scene, and tonight's show at the newest hit venue in Portland, The Woods.

What inspired you for this album The Farmer?

Well, Brian Coates (of The Great Northwest) for sure, and anyone on the committee, dead or alive, that I could imagine listening to it. At the time, I was living in the rock dorm and Brian Coates lived downstairs. He writes melodic, acoustic, trippy, sad songs, and I was tying to do a bunch of songs like his in that way. Then eight years later, when he was recording Zia MaCabe’s (Dandy Warhols' keyboardist) album, he was recording her. She’d get done at 10:00 p.m, they’d work until then and then I came in, broke out all the old cassettes, and Brian and I would work until six in the morning. But yeah, I’d say the biggest influence would be Brian Coates.

A portion of the proceeds from The Farmer are going to the MS Foundation. Why is that a cause that’s important to you?

My dad has MS, and when I’d recorded this with Coatsie, I didn’t know what I was going to do with it. We put it on and it sounded pretty cool, and we wanted to do something with it that would be different. Most albums, especially something like this, they just come and go and they wouldn’t really matter that much. But I wanted to think of a way for a different audience to hear it, and I started thinking of charity things, and MS was an obvious one, considering my Dad, and the fact that I’d done the MS walk a few times, so we called up the people at the Oregon chapter at the MS Society, so we’re contributing some of the proceeds to fight MS.

What are the highlights of your career so far?

There’s a handful. There’s been a few massive concerts, big shows around the world, but I think the main thing would be just having musical peers show appreciation by coming to your concerts, or mentioning in the press how much they like a certain song or album. Having David Bowie and his band come to see us play a few times made us feel really good. Generally when you start a band, you’re not thinking about fame or money or chicks, you’re just trying to be accepted by your peers in the music world. Even if it’s just some fantasy figure you imagine, that’s what you’re really thinking of. So to have Joe Strummer walk up to me at a festival and ask when we were going on, and tell me he loved the music, or having Bowie come to the show, it makes it easier to sleep at night. It makes it easier to ignore it when you hear some snotty reviewer rag on you - you rest assured that they’re wrong. I care more about Joe Strummer's opinion than some guy writing for some rag out of Denver who gives us a shitty review.

What’s next for you?

We have the Dandy Warhols greatest hits collection coming out, which we’re calling The Capitol Years, considering the fact that we never really had a collection, or more than one semi-hit. It’s just a collection of songs that had videos, or were sent to radio stations by Capitol Records. There are two bonus tracks, and those are just about done. I’m also recording an album of songs of mine and my friends Bob Harrow and Gamma, who are both from Australia. We’re calling it Immigrant Union. We’re recording it with Greg Williams who produced the album Thirteen Tales for the Dandys. The ultimate dream for Immigrant Union is to tour country music fairs, going overseas, playing the Grand Ole Opry, the Austin City Limits Festival…just that other world of country world of hillbilly folk. It’s a world I don’t know, but I’d really like to. That’s the band that’ll play with me on April 30th, at The Woods. It’s $15, but it’s worth it because the money goes to a good cause.

Brent De Boer’s solo record The Farmer is raising money to fight MS, and is available now on CD Baby.

- Arielle Mullen

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Spirituals Drops New Track in Anticipation of Forthcoming Album

 

Spirituals is the pseudonym for musician, producer and graphic designer, Tyler Tadlock. After recently moving from Jackson, Mississippi, he began working on his first album, coming out soon on Waaga Records.

His electronic, sample-based tunes draw heavily from extensive sampling, recorded from free jazz projects back in Jackson. A new track by the name of "Wanderings" has just been released and can be heard below:

The track sounds glitchy without being too edgy or annoying. Sounds and samples break and build as the song slowly gains repetitive momentum. It's pretty cool, refreshing and different than a lot of other stuff out there - check it.

The debut album is slated for release June 22nd.

- Joel Sommer

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Album Review: Pony Village, "Self-titled EP"

 

 

Pony Village’s self-titled debut EP shows just how much potential the quartet possesses. Completely self-released, and pressed onto 12” vinyl, the record captures the quaint, lo-fi, DIY vibe as well as the sparkle of larger things to come. “We give away free CD's with [the record] at shows,” explains vocalist Ryan Barber, “but we recorded [Pony Village] with the intention of putting out a record, and I feel that CD's are really only something that people put into their computer once and then forget about.”

Listening to Pony Village on vinyl brings me back to Northwest indie rock in the late nineties. The succinct drum taps and warbling slide guitar coupled with Barber’s pleasantly off key voice is reminiscent of Keep It Like a Secret-era Built to Spill, while echoed, unhurried soundscapes and Barber’s breathy, high-pitched vocal tone is nostalgic to Death Cab for Cutie’s Something About Airplanes.

Although the foursome has clear influences, its music is not a total pastiche. You can hear the genuineness in Barber’s voice as he sings, “Why did you bring me back again? I was at Pacific Pines, the sand on the beach at night, it looked almost white,” in “Depoe Bay,” a track paying homage to a quaint coastal town well known to us Oregonians, and encompassing the same dreariness that reminds us all of the Oregon coast.

Pony Village - Depoe Bay from Rodrigo Melgarejo on Vimeo.

The six-song EP ends on a strong note with “You Play, You Pay,” a beautifully eerie, sweeping piece played in minor chords saturated in reverb. The track begins with a droning guitar riff and drum beat that eases into Barber’s airy voice asking his listener to “Lay your ear to the ground, do you hear the sound? The one I can’t allow.” The chilling uneasiness of this track is fit for a record player on a gray Portland day.

If Pony Village’s LP, which is currently in the works, sounds anything like this debut, Barber will have no reason to worry about someone listening to it once than forgetting about it, whether it be on record or CD.

-Katrina Nattress

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PDX Pop Now! "Make It Pop" fundraiser TOMORROW night

Every year, the guys and gals of PDX Pop Now! work their asses off to host a rad summer weekend music festival showcasing local under the radar acts. Since the organization is non-profit, it raises money for the big event via smaller benefits.

One such fundraiser happens tomorrow evening at The Cleaners in the Ace Hotel. Make It Pop! will be an all ages evening filled with music, complimentary food from Firehouse Restaurant, St. Cupcake, Bakery Bar, Fifty Licks and drinks from Captured by Porches Brewing, Klickitat Canyon Winery, and C & G Wines.

While you are filling your belly with delectable eats and drinks, enjoy the chilling, disjointed harmonies of Musee Mecanique, the campfire melodies of Ah Holly Fam’ly, the mellow folk of Alialujah Choir, and the always wonderful storytelling of The DecemberistsColin Meloy.

Oh yeah, and did I mention there will also be a silent auction with contributors including Kill Rock Stars, Tender Loving Empire, Blitzen Trapper, and Stumptown Coffee?

If you’re not going to be watching the Blazers kick some Suns ass, this is the place to be Thursday night. Make It Pop! begins at 6:30 pm. Tickets cost $35.

-Katrina Nattress

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Stephanie Schneiderman at Mississippi Studios this Saturday

 

Stephanie Schneiderman is a Northwest staple, so I won’t go on and on about her past, but I do have to give some major kudos where it is deserved. Not only is she this amazing mix of Sade, Amy Lee and Stevie Knicks, but she also acts, raises large amounts of money for humanitarian issues, and moonlights in her successful side band Dirty Martini.

Schneiderman has released six solo albums and two collaborative albums, and has impressed the likes of well known electronic musician/producer/DJ Keith Schreiner and James Beaton of Storm and the Balls, both of whom collaborated with her on her last album Dangerous Fruit.

What I appreciate the most about her music, though, is her eclectic mix - one minute she sounds a little country, the next she throws down some Latin beats, and then she goes a little gangsta on us and sings with a T-Pain style voice box.

If you can only see one band this week, this month, or this year, I recommend it be her. Stephanie Schneiderman, Garrison Starr and Pat Kearns from Blue Skies For Black Hearts will be at Mississippi Studios this Saturday, May 1st, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10.

- Deanna Uutela

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